Indonesian Food

Mee Goreng – How to cook great noodles in 4 quick steps

This is a detailed tutorial for preparing delicious mee goreng noodles. It includes cooking processes, ingredients and step-by-step instructions on how to make this dish with minimal effort.

“Mee goreng sauce recipe” is a dish that is popular in Indonesia. It’s easy to make and tastes great. You can learn how to cook this dish in 4 quick steps. Read more in detail here: mee goreng sauce recipe.

Today, I’d like to present Mee Goreng Mamak, a stir-fried noodle dish with a long cultural legacy of Indian Muslim origin in Malaysia. 

Noodles are referred to as mee, while stir-frying is referred to as goreng in both Malay and Indonesian languages. 

Due to differences in Ingredients and flavors, Mee Goreng (sometimes spelled mi goreng) differs significantly from Chinese noodles such as Chow Mien and Malaysian Char Kuey Teow. 

The most popular option is fresh yellow noodles, followed by dry quick noodles. You may use Chinese egg noodles, which are abundantly available, but this is not the traditional way to prepare mee goreng. 

Mee goreng has become linked with Mamak shops and businesses since these noodle dishes are always served in these establishments. It’s a kind of street cuisine that few locals have ever experienced.

This dish is inspired by the cooking of Indian Muslims in Malaysia. Other mee goreng dishes from other locations may be found. They’re all referring to fried noodles with the same language. 

Today I want to introduce a stir-frying noodle with a deep cultural heritage of the Indian Muslim origin in Malaysia - Mee Goreng Mamak. Noodles are referred to as mee, while stir-frying is referred to as goreng in both Malay and Indonesian languages.

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In Malaysia, mee goreng Mamak has a distinct flavor. 

Let me emphasize the distinctiveness of these noodles. Potatoes and tofu are two essential elements in mee goreng. Another essential element is ketchup. These spicy noodles are made with a lot of chili sauce and sambal, a sautéed chili paste. 

It will be served with curries and potatoes at the restaurant. We’ll use curry powder in the recipe and boil some potatoes separately since we don’t want to prepare a pot of curry only for the mee goreng. 

Here’s how to make a simple Malaysian chicken curry with potatoes. If you’ve already cooked the mee goreng, use it instead of the Malaysian curry powder and boiled potatoes.

Most restaurants offer it as a vegetarian meal, which is how mee goreng is traditionally served. You may make it more interesting by adding shrimp, squid, or beef to the dish. 

Here is a step-by-step recipe for mee goreng mamak.

1. Run the noodles under boiling water to blanch them. 

It’s preferable to blanch the yellow noodles in boiling water for a few seconds so they loosen up. Remove, drain, and put aside the noodles once they are no longer stuck together. Frying mee that does not cling together is easy.

2. Get the Ingredients ready.

This mee goreng mamak dish requires a few key Ingredients:

Cabbage is a required element in a variety of fried noodles in many nations. It works because the crispness contrasts sharply with the softness of the noodles. There are no exceptions when it comes to mee goreng.

To decrease the cooking time in half, chop the cabbage into thin strips. 

Another common ingredient in mee goreng mamak is firm tofu. Firm tofu is always preferred since soft tofu may break into little pieces when stir-fried. If you purchase conventional tofu, I recommend deep-frying it (or pan-frying it for a less greasy version) until firm before adding it to the noodles.

Other protein sources may be added to the mee. Shrimps, squids, and chicken flesh are all popular choices. This dish contains chicken flesh, but if you want to make it vegetarian, leave it out. 

Another common component in mee goreng mamak is cucur udang (prawn fritters). One or two prawn fritters will be chopped into smaller pieces and fried alongside the mee. We’re not operating a restaurant here, so we’ll leave it out of our mee goreng recipe.

Another important element in mee mamak is potato. In a restaurant, the chef will remove the potato from the curry pot. By pre-boiling some potato wedges, we’ll be able to replicate the same procedure. 

3. Get the sauce ready.

The flavors used for mee goreng vary significantly from those used for Chinese, Vietnamese, and Japanese noodles. The needed component is kicap manis (sweet soy sauce). It has a distinct taste that cannot be replaced by other forms of soy sauce.

Tomato paste or fresh tomato should not be used to replace ketchup; otherwise, the dish would taste more like bolognese.

The classic recipe calls for chili sauce, but I appreciate that not everyone can handle hot meals. As a result, you must modify the spiciness level yourself. The natives love to add sambal (a local sautéed chili paste) and chopped bird’s eye chilies to the mee goreng to make it more hotter.

Other types of spice are more popular in Asian cuisines. Although oyster sauce is not a traditional spice, I use a tiny bit to add flavor.

Once you’ve measured out all of the seasoning Ingredients in a bowl, dilute it with some water to make it easier to pour into the pan while stir-frying. You may add each ingredient individually, but since there are so many on the list, premixing the seasoning will prevent any omissions or unintentional double-ups.

Today I want to introduce a stir-frying noodle with a deep cultural heritage of the Indian Muslim origin in Malaysia - Mee Goreng Mamak. It is also called mi goreng .

4. Fry the mee – a few tips before you begin 

Within five minutes of preparing the sauce and all of the Ingredients, you can have it on the table. That’s why I like stir-frying since it’s the easiest way to prepare any dish. 

  1. Get yourself a decent wok. Because the eggs tend to adhere to the wok’s surface, use a well-seasoned wok. You may also wish to use a big nonstick pan since, unlike other Chinese stir fry meals, this one does not need high heat. 
  2. Cut the choy sum stem into one-centimeter slices. Stir-fry for a minute or two with the cabbage strips before adding the choy sum leafy section. Cooking the stem until it softens takes a little longer. 
  3. Muslims in India can eat spicy cuisine. Chili boh (local chili paste), sambal (sauté chili, garlic, and onion paste), and bird’s-eye chili are all common Ingredients. Because not everyone can handle the original recipe’s degree of heat, I’ve left out all of these Ingredients, leaving just the bottled chili sauce in the recipe. This bottled chili sauce isn’t too spicy, which is important to preserve the taste as realistic as possible. 
  4. Instead of topping the mee with a fried egg or an omelet scrambled into little pieces, add the egg last. Before folding the eggs into the noodles, they should be almost done. It will partly coat the noodles and blend with the sauce as they cook. The slightly moist mee goreng with eggs, known in Malay as mee goreng basah, is my favorite. That is, without a doubt, the Malaysian style mee goreng you will find in local supermarkets.
  5. To add additional level of flavor to the mee, squeeze some fresh lime juice over it immediately before serving. (Optional)
  6. The order in which the Ingredients are added is not important, except that the veggies must be added first and the eggs must always be added last. The most important thing is to equally blend the sauce and the noodles. If the sauce is too dry to integrate properly with the noodles, add extra water. The finished product should be somewhat damp, rather than as dry as typical Chinese stir-fry noodles. 
  7. Noodles and eggs cling to the pan readily, particularly when cooked at high heat. Stir cook the noodles over medium heat. The taste is the product of the spices and substances combined. The notion of wok-hei has a secondary role in mee goreng mamak since it is not as reliant on high heat. 

Other mee goreng Mamak-related dishes

If you enjoy this mee goreng dish, you’ll probably want to try some of the other popular Malaysian/Indonesian noodles. Here are some of my favorites:

Soto ayam (Indonesian chicken soup) is a popular Indonesian meal. It’s a transparent soup with so many components and toppings that no other chicken soup compares.

Ipoh Hor Fun is a soup noodle made from chicken bones and shrimp shells in an unusual broth. The shredded chicken is the major component, apart from the broth. It is one of the most popular Chinese soup noodles in Malaysia.

At the World Street Food Congress 2017 in Manila, Penang’s Siam Road Char Kuey Teow was named 14th on the World Street Food Top 50 list. Chinese sausage, cockles, pork crackling, and lots of wok scent go into this noodle dish.

15-minute prep time

Time to cook: 10 minutes

25-minute total time

Ingredients

Sauce (A)

Others are (B)

  • yellow noodles (450g)
  • 3 tbsp oil (cooking)
  • 3 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
  • 1 finely sliced tiny onion (70g)
  • 75 grams of chicken breast flesh, thinly sliced
  • choy sum (150g)
  • 100g finely sliced cabbage
  • 150g tofu (firm)
  • 1/2 tomato, diced (50g)
  • 1 small (70g) potato, chopped and cooked till soft
  • Bird’s eye chili and sambal (to adjust spiciness)
  • 3 eggs
  • a half teaspoon of salt
  • 1 lime (for decorating and juice)

Instructions

    1. Blanch the mee for fifteen seconds in boiling water. Drain the water and put it aside.
    2. In a mixing bowl, combine all of the ingredients (A).
    3. In a wok, heat some cooking oil. Cook until the onion and garlic are fragrant. 
    4. Season with salt and pepper after adding the chicken bread meat. Fry until it is little golden and done.
    5. Season the choy sum and cabbage with salt and stir-fry with a little oil. If it’s too dry, add extra water.
    6. Return the chicken meat to the skillet after the veggies have softened. The tofu, tomatoes, potatoes, and sauce are then added (A).
    7. Combine the yellow noodles with the other ingredients in the pan. If it’s too thick, thin it out with some water.
    8. Increase the heat to medium/high and continue to stir-fry for a minute.
    9. Reduce the heat to a low setting. The noodles should then be pushed to one side of the skillet. Pour in some additional oil and break the egg into the pan.
    10. With the spatula, spread out the egg and fold it into the noodles gently. Because it will be sticky, constant stirring and flipping will be required. Remove from the oven and serve with a slice of lime on the side.

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Information about nutrition:

Yield:

3

Size of Serving:

3 portions Per Serving Amount: 877 calories 37g total fat 7g Saturated Fat 0g trans fat 24g of unsaturated fat 243 milligrams of cholesterol 1890mg sodium 94g carbohydrate 10 g fiber 21 g sugar 45 g protein

Nutritionix gave and computed this information on 8/12/2019.

The “indonesian mee goreng recipe” is a delicious and easy way to make noodles. With just 4 quick steps, you will have great noodles for your next meal.

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Frequently Asked Questions

How do you make mi goreng noodles better?

A: You can make mi goreng noodles better by deep frying them in a mix of vegetable oil. This will give the noodles a crunchy texture and an extra crispy taste.

How do I make instant goreng noodles?

A: To make instant goreng noodles, take a cup of boiling water and pour over the dried rice noodles. Let them soak for about 20 minutes before draining off the excess water with a colander or sieve.

How can I make my instant Mi Goreng better?

A: The best way is to make sure you are always wearing clean clothes and cooking your instant noodles in boiling water for just under a minute.

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  • mee goreng recipe zamboanga
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  • spicy mee goreng recipe

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