Chinese Food

Taro puffs – How to make the best dim sum with remarkable taste & texture

Taro puffs are one of the most popular dim sum dishes to be made in a taro paper skin. In this recipe, we use whole wheat flour and baking powder for extra tenderness along with soy sauce, sugar and sesame oil for flavor. The cooking process is simple: bring water on a boil then place the wrapped dough into it filling side up until they float to the top so that you can remove them from your pot using a slotted spoon or skimmer.

Taro puffs are a type of dim sum that is made by deep-frying taro paste. The best way to make the perfect taro puff is to use a combination of water and cornstarch mixed together. It will create a dough-like texture in the end. You can also add sugar, salt or other flavorings if you want to change up the taste.

Taro puffs (wu gok, woo kok, taro dumpling) are a renowned Hong Kong dim sum that attracts everyone’s attention at yum-cha time. 

The classic dim sum store would stack it with char siu bao, shumai, and the greatest Deep-fried dim sum of all, taro puff, on a pushcart with a glass window. 

From afar, you’ll know those puffed-up, honeycomb-like golden balls with crispy surfaces and soft and creamy taro paste breath as the dim sum woman trundles the cart along the tiny lane of marble tables and antique chairs.

The recipe for making it at home may be found here. It’s not tough at all. The only aspect of deep-frying that requires extra care is the temperature of the oil. To make taro puffs successfully, you must first complete this step.

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Taro puffs (woo kok / 芋角) are made with wheat starch and taro root. Stuff with meat filling with a honeycomb-like crispy exterior. Best dim sum ever.

Prepare the filling first. 

  1. Soak the dried shrimp in water for a few minutes to rehydrate them, then finely chop and put aside. 
  2. Pork shoulder and shrimp should be cut into tiny pieces (about the size of sweet corn). Taro puff filling may be made using pork shoulder. Otherwise, the butcher should be able to provide you with ground pork containing fats.
  3. Soak the shiitake mushrooms in water until they are tender. Remove the stem and dice the vegetable. 
  4. In a pan, heat the peanut oil. 
  5. In a wok over medium heat, stir-fry the minced pork, followed by the dried shrimps and shrimp.
  6. Toss in the mushrooms.
  7. Oyster sauce, ground white pepper, dark soy sauce, sugar, and salt are used to season.
  8. Fill the pan with 1/4 cup of water. Bring the water to a boil. 
  9. 2 teaspoons cornstarch and 2 tablespoons cold water are combined to make a cornstarch slurry. Using the cornstarch slurry, thicken the stuffing. 
  10. Finally, pour in the sesame oil, give it a few stirs, and remove it from the fire. 
  11. Refrigerate for three hours once it has returned to room temperature before using as the filling for the taro puffs. 

Note:

  • For added taste, some people like to add tiny diced sweet turnips, while others add green peas, green onions, and carrots. The components in this recipe are the standard savory filling found in most Cantonese dim sum establishments.
  • To improve the flavor, you may add some mild soy sauce or chicken bouillon to the spice.

2. Make the puff pastry 

  1. Remove the taro’s skin and discard it. 
  2. Cut the taro into thin slices that are approximately an inch long and a half-inch thick. 
  3. For thirty minutes, steam the taro over high heat. If you can mash it with a fork, it’s done.
  4. In a mixing basin, mash the taro until it creates a soft paste with no lumps. 
  5. In a separate dish, measure the wheat starch. 
  6. Pour 150ml hot water, ideally boiling, into the wheat starch and mix until a sticky lump forms. The heat will cook and gelatinize the starch, which is necessary for the taro puffs to expand when Deep-fried. 
  7. Mix the mashed taro with the wheat starch until it is completely smooth. 
  8. Using five-spice powder, salt, and powdered white pepper, season the taro mixture.
  9. Finally, completely combine the lard and butter. 
  10. Refrigerate the dough for two hours before using in a covered container or wrapped in cling film. After being chilled, the dough will become stiffer to handle.

Note:

  • Taro puffs are most often made using lard. You can make it pork-free by replacing the shortening or butter with shortening or butter. In this recipe, I use a combination of lard and butter. Taro puffs may also be made using coconut oil, according to certain recipes.
  • A tiny quantity of ammonium bicarbonate (called as in Cantonese) may also be added. It’s a leavening ingredient that aids in the formation of a honeycomb-like surface. However, it is difficult to get outside of Asia, and it is only available in limited quantities in Malaysia. You may leave it out or replace it with baking soda.
  • Wheat starch is available in most Asian supermarkets.

3. Arrange the taro puffs as desired.

  1. Remove the dough from the fridge and knead it for a minute before shaping it into a long strip. Each portion of dough should be roughly 40g. 
  2. Roll the dough into a ball, flatten it with your hand, and then push the center down to make a shallow bowl with a diameter of approximately three inches. 
  3. Fill the ‘bowl’ to the brim with enough filling. For a 40g dough, 15g of filling is required. To seal the puff, fold it into a half-moon shape and compress firmly. 

Note:

  • Before deep-frying, the wrapped taro puffs may be refrigerated for a few days.

Taro puffs (woo kok / 芋角) are made with wheat starch and taro root. Stuff with meat filling with a honeycomb-like crispy exterior. Best dim sum ever.

4. fried in oil 

  1. Using a kitchen thermometer, bring the oil to a temperature of 170°C/340°F. You may also toss a tiny amount of dough into the hot oil. When the dough is intact and does not break apart, and it floats to the top in a few seconds, the temperature is acceptable for deep frying. 
  2. If the oil temperature isn’t quite right, the crispy crust that appears like spider webs won’t develop. Also, be sure to use enough oil to completely immerse the taro puffs in order to ensure equal frying.
  3. Put the taro puffs on a slotted spoon and carefully drop them into the oil until they are completely immersed. 
  4. The taro puffs should be Deep-fried till golden brown. 
  5. Remove it from the pan and place it on paper towels to absorb any remaining oil.
  6. Serve while the taro puffs are still crunchy. 

Note:

  • The temperature of the oil is critical. If the oil temperature is too low, the puff will immediately come apart. On the other side, if the temperature is too high, it will become brown too quickly and the spider web texture will not form. Please see the illustration below.
  • To deep-fry the taro puffs, I recommend using a wok or a heavy-bottomed pot.
  • To deep-fry the puffs, I like to use a big slotted spoon rather than a wire mesh strainer. While frying, the puffs are easier to adhere to the wire mesh.

Tips:

  • Maintaining the temperature of the oil may be difficult. Deep-frying one taro puff first and counting the number of bubbles rising around it is the most practical method. If there are too many bubbles rising around the puffs, I generally drop them gently into the oil and lift the slotted spoon higher to minimize the temperature. It’s difficult to explain in words, so please watch the video for a demonstration.

Here’s how to freeze woo kok that hasn’t been cooked:

Place the taro puffs on a tray lined with a baking sheet after they’ve been filled and molded into an oval shape. After that, place them in the freezer until they are solid. Then, since they will no longer cling together, transfer them to a freezer bag to store. It is possible to keep me for up to a month.

Other taro puffs-related dishes

If you enjoy taro puffs, try creating the following snacks and dim sum.

  • When you bite into our spring rolls, they are light, crispy, and airy, and they shatter in your mouth. This is a tried-and-true dish that everyone enjoys.
  • Shumai is a pork and shrimp paste-filled open-end dumpling covered in a thin pasty skin. Throughout the years, it has remained my favorite Dim Sum. 
  • Learn how to prepare shrimp dumplings (har gow) that taste just like the ones you get at a Chinese restaurant.

30 minute prep time

30 minutes to prepare

1 hour in total

Ingredients

A list of ingredients (filling)

B Ingredients (seasonings for filling)

C Ingredients (pastry)

Instructions

Make the stuffing first. 

  1. In a wok over medium heat, stir-fry the minced pork with oil, then the roughly chopped dried shrimps, shrimp, and mushroom dice.
  2. Oyster sauce, ground white pepper, dark soy sauce, sugar, and salt are used to season.
  3. Fill the pan with 1/4 cup of water. Bring the water to a boil. 
  4. Using the cornstarch slurry, thicken the stuffing. 
  5. Finally, add the beef mixture to the sesame oil and remove it from the heat. 
  6. Before using, chill for three hours.

Make the puff pastry. 

  1. Cut the taro into thin slices that are approximately an inch long and a half-inch thick. 
  2. For thirty minutes, steam the taro over high heat. 
  3. Mash it until it’s a smooth, lump-free paste. 
  4. Pour 150ml hot water, ideally boiling, into the wheat starch and mix until a sticky lump forms. 
  5. Mix the mashed taro with the wheat starch until it is completely smooth. 
  6. Using five-spice powder, salt, and powdered white pepper, season the taro mixture.
  7. Finally, completely combine the lard and butter. 
  8. Refrigerate for at least two hours before using. 

Make the taro puffs in whichever shape you choose.

  1. Remove the dough from the fridge and divide it into 40g halves. 
  2. Form a disc out of the dough by flattening it.
  3. Fold 15 grams of the filling into a half-moon shape.

Deep-fried 

  1. Put the taro puffs on a slotted spoon and carefully drop them into the oil (170°C/340°F) until they are completely immersed. 
  2. The taro puffs should be Deep-fried till golden brown. 
  3. Remove it from the pan and place it on paper towels to absorb any remaining oil.

Notes

  • Lard or shortening may be used in place of butter.
  • If desired, use chicken breast flesh.
  • After removing the skin, the weight of taro is calculated.

Products to Consider

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Information about nutrition:

Yield:

15

Size of Serving:

1 tbsp. per serving 143 calories 8g total fat 3 g saturated fat 0g trans fat 5 g of unsaturated fat 17 milligrams of cholesterol 377mg sodium 14g carbohydrate 1 gram of fiber 0 g sugar 3 g protein

Nutritionix submitted and computed this information on April 13, 2022.

Taro puffs are a popular dim sum dish. Taro is used in the recipe to give it a crispy texture, while also giving it a unique flavor. The best way to make these tasty treats is by using the traditional taro basket method. Reference: crispy taro basket.

Related Tags

  • taro puff near me
  • wu gok near me
  • taro puffs recipe
  • taro croquettes
  • fried dim sum

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