Indian Food

Til Chikki (Sesame Brittle)

Til Chikki is a small, soft-centered chocolate and caramilk peanut brittle sold in most Middle Eastern grocery stores. When the product first came to Israel, it was called “Til Ah” (the name of the founder’s daughter) but her father later renamed it after she died. Til Chikki has been described as one of the best desserts in Tel Aviv.,

Til Chikki is a type of sesame brittle that is made with white sugar and egg whites. It is soft and crunchy, and has a sweet taste. The recipe for the brittle includes butter, vanilla extract, milk, salt, flour, baking powder, sesame seeds and eggs. Read more in detail here: soft til chikki recipe.

Chikki Til is a sesame seed and jaggery brittle that is extremely popular in northern India throughout the winter! With just two primary components, it’s simple to create at home. It keeps for weeks in an airtight container and is a tasty snack or treat when you’re wanting something sweet!

Chikki Til squares placed in a blue plate with bowls of jaggery and sesame seeds placed in the background

Til (sesame) is a popular snack in Northern India during the winter months. I know it’s used in a variety of recipes in both the western and eastern portions of India, but my family’s favorite way to eat it was in chikkis and ladoos.

Every year during the winter, my nani used to make til ladoos. They used to be my favorite, and she used to make them with both white and black sesame seeds. During the cold months in Delhi, I also ate a lot of Chikki Til. My mother used to buy a lot of these and peanut chikki only for me. I miss her terribly, as well as those great carefree days!

We don’t have decent chikki here, so I make them Chikki Til at home every year throughout the winter. Although they are not difficult to prepare, there are a few factors that might make or break this dish.

What exactly is Chikki?

If you’re not familiar with the phrase, chikki refers to brittle produced with peanuts, sesame seeds, and other nuts. They’re usually cooked with sugar or jaggery (raw sugar obtained from sugar cane), and they’re very popular in the winter.

During the months of December and January, you’ll see a number of roadside vendors selling blocks of chikkis in Delhi. Til Gajjak is another name for this kind of Chikki Til.

squares of Chikki Til stacked together and arranged on a blue color plate

Jaggery Syrup Consistency Is Critical!

The most crucial step in this recipe is to get the sugar syrup to the proper consistency. If you overcook it, it will burn and lose its flavor, and if you undercook it, the chikki will lose its snap. We don’t want a soft chikki, either!

There are two methods to tell whether your syrup is the appropriate consistency:

Using a kitchen thermometer: Using a kitchen thermometer is the most accurate method to verify whether your syrup has reached the appropriate consistency. It should reach 300 degrees Fahrenheit (hard crack stage), which is the correct temperature to make this brittle.

If you don’t have a kitchen thermometer, the simplest approach to verify the sugar consistency is to drop a little amount of syrup into a bowl of water and look for the following:

  • When it falls into water, it should not spread.
  • It should break readily after it has cooled a bit. There should be a satisfying snap when you break it. It shouldn’t be too soft or susceptible to mold.
  • It should not cling to your teeth if you bite it. These indicators indicate that the syrup is heated and at the proper stage.

Chikki Til’s Ingredients

This tik chikki is made using just three ingredients!

Chikki Til's Ingredients arranged on a board

Sesame seeds: I used white sesame seeds in this recipe. This recipe calls for hulled, unroasted sesame seeds. You may also mix white and sesame seeds together.

Jaggery: I like soft jaggery for this recipe, but it may also be prepared with hard jaggery (first break it into pieces) or jaggery powder.

Ghee: Although ghee is optional, it is highly preferred since it gives the chikkis a glossy appearance.

I also add a bit of baking soda, but it’s not required. However, it enhances the texture of the chikki.

Instructions in Detail

1- Preheat a skillet over medium heat. Toss in 200 grams of sesame seeds.

2- Dry roast the seeds for about 4 minutes, stirring constantly, until they begin to sputter. Browning them will result in a bitter flavor. Place the roasted seeds on a serving platter.

3- Add 2 teaspoons melted ghee and 200 grams soft jaggery to the same pan.

4- Stir until the jaggery is fully melted.

step by step picture collage of making Chikki Til

5- Once the jaggery has melted, reduce the heat to low and let the syrup to simmer. Remember, you don’t want to burn the jaggery, so keep the heat low.

6- Cook until the syrup reaches 300 degrees Fahrenheit on a kitchen thermometer. If you don’t have a kitchen thermometer, put some syrup in a dish of water and let it sit for a few minutes. When you drop it in water, it should not spread. If you attempt to break the syrup with your fingers, it should snap rather than be mushy or create threads. It’s also edible and shouldn’t cling to your teeth if you bite it. That is the proper stage.

After adding the jaggery to the pan, it took me 10 to 11 minutes to get to this point (heat was at lowest after the jaggery melted). Depending on the thickness of the pan and the strength of the heat, it may take longer or shorter.

7- Add 2 little pinches of baking soda at this step (optional but improves the texture of chikki so I recommend it). Remove from heat and stir in the toasted sesame seeds.

8- Start combining the sesame seeds with the syrup with a spatula, working violently and rapidly since this combination hardens fast.

step by step picture collage of making Chikki Til

9- Stir until the sesame seeds are completely covered in the syrup.

10- Pour the mixture onto parchment paper right away. Roll it up with another layer of parchment paper on top while it’s still warm. I rolled the mixture to a thickness of 1/6 inch. The thinner you roll the dough, the crispier it will be.

11- Carefully peel away the top parchment paper. Then, while it’s still soft and not set, create marks with a knife. This will make breaking the chikki simpler in the future. I decided on 2-inch squares and labelled them appropriately. Allow 30 to 60 minutes for it to cool to room temperature.

12- Break the strips first, then each strip into squares once it has fully set. The previous marks make it simpler to break them.

step by step picture collage of making Chikki Til

Storage

Store the chikki in an airtight container after it has cooled. They should last for at least 2 weeks, if not longer. In my home, they seldom last more than a week, and yes, I eat them all!

Important Points to Remember When Making Chikki

Don’t brown the sesame seeds: When toasting sesame seeds, keep in mind that you don’t want them to brown. If you do this, they will taste harsh and will detract from the flavor of the chikki.

Cook the jaggery until it reaches the desired consistency: see the recommendations above, but this is the most crucial element of the procedure. Cook the syrup until it reaches 300 degrees Fahrenheit.

Set the heat to the lowest level: Once the jaggery has melted, reduce the heat to the lowest setting. It will take some time for the jaggery to cook and reach that level, and if the heat is too high or too low, it will burn and ruin the flavor. So just maintain the heat on a low setting.

Use a thick pan to ensure that the jaggery does not burn when cooking and that the heat is distributed evenly.

By weight, use an equal number of sesame seeds and jaggery: if feasible, use a kitchen scale. Soft jaggery, hard jaggery, and jaggery powder are all various types of jaggery that measure differently in cups. As a result, it’s advisable to utilize the weight in grams for precision. Use equal amounts of sesame seeds and jaggery in this recipe (in grams).

Add 2 tiny pinches of baking soda to the syrup as soon as it achieves the correct consistency. This is optional, but I strongly advise it. Improves the chikki’s texture and makes the brittle less difficult to bite.

Once the sesame seeds have been blended in, act swiftly: the mixture starts to solidify rapidly once the sesame seeds have been added, so you’ll need to move quickly once you’ve added the toasted seeds back in. Rapidly combine sesame seeds, then transfer to parchment paper and roll quickly while still warm. You’ll also need to create brief lines with a knife so that it’s simpler to rip it apart after it’s set in.

stacks of Chikki Til arranged on a blue plate with white sesame seeds scattered all around

Most Commonly Asked Questions

Can I add spices to the chikki?

Yes, you may use cardamom powder. Depending on how much cardamom taste you want, I’d use 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon. You may also throw in a few dried rose petals.

Is it possible to make this chikki vegan?

Yes, oil should be used instead of ghee.

Is it possible to use sugar instead of jaggery?

Yes, you may use sugar in this recipe, but you’ll need to simmer it to the same consistency as the syrup.

If you’ve tried this dish, please remember to give it a rating! You may also keep up with what’s going on in my kitchen by following me on Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube.

Chikki Til

Chikki Til squares placed in a blue plate with bowls of jaggery and sesame seeds placed in the background

Manali

Chikki Til is a brittle made with sesame seeds and jaggery! It’s popular in northern India during winters and makes a delicious little treat!

Time to prepare: 5 minutes

15 minutes to prepare

30 minutes to set up

50 minutes total

Appetizer, Dessert, and Snack

Indian cuisine

30 chikkis per serving

Calories (kcal): 65

  • Preheat a skillet over medium heat. Toss in 200 grams of sesame seeds. Dry roast for 4 minutes, stirring constantly, until seeds begin to spatter. Browning them will result in a bitter flavor. Place the roasted seeds on a serving platter.

  • Add 2 teaspoon melted ghee and 200 grams soft jaggery to the same pan. Stir until the jaggery has fully melted.

  • Set the heat to the lowest setting and let the syrup to simmer after the jaggery has melted. Remember, you don’t want to burn the jaggery, so keep the heat low.

  • Cook the syrup until it reaches 300 F on your kitchen thermometer. If you don’t have a kitchen thermometer, drop some syrup in a bowl filled with water. It shouldn’t spread when you drop it in water. Then if you try to break that syrup with your fingers, it should snap and should not be soft or form any strings. You can also bite it and it shouldn’t stick to your teeth. That’s the correct stage. After adding the jaggery to the pan, it took me 10 to 11 minutes to get to this point (heat was at lowest after the jaggery melted). Depending on the thickness of the pan and the strength of the heat, it may take longer or shorter.

  • Add 2 tiny pinches of baking soda at this time (optional but improves the texture of chikki so I recommend it). Remove from heat and stir in the toasted sesame seeds.

  • Start combining the sesame seeds with the syrup with a spatula, working violently and rapidly since this combination hardens fast. Mix until the sesame seeds are completely covered with syrup.

  • Transfer the mixture on parchment paper right away. Roll it up with another layer of parchment paper on top while it’s still warm. I rolled the mixture to a thickness of 1/6 inch. The thinner you roll the dough, the crispier it will be.

  • Carefully remove the top parchment paper. Then, while it’s still soft and not set, create marks with a knife. This will make breaking the chikki simpler in the future. I decided on 2-inch squares and labelled them appropriately. Allow it to sit at room temperature for 30 to 60 minutes.

  • Break the strips first, then each strip into squares after it has totally hardened. The previous marks make it simpler to break them. Keep the container sealed.

  • To prepare the ideal chikki, please sure to follow the tips in the article. The syrup consistency is the most important aspect of this recipe.
  • To make it vegan, replace the ghee with coconut oil.
  • Cardamom powder, rose petals, and other spices may be used to flavor the chikki.

calorie count: 65 kcal 7g Carbohydrates 1 gram of protein 4 g fat 1 gram of saturated fat 1 gram polyunsaturated fat 1 gram monounsaturated fat 1 milligram of cholesterol 1 milligram sodium 31 milligrams of potassium 1 gram of fiber 6 g sugar 1 IU vitamin A 67 milligrams of calcium 1 milligram of iron

Watch This Video-

Til Chikki is a popular Indian sweet made from sesame seeds and sugar. It is also known as Sesame Brittle or Sesame Balls in the United States. Reference: til ladoo hebbar kitchen.

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Frequently Asked Questions

Is til chikki healthy?

A: To answer your question, I have reviewed the nutritional facts of Til Chikki and it is not healthy.

Does eating til chikki increase weight?

What is sesame brittle made of?

A: Sesame brittle is made of sesame seeds, sugar, and water.

Related Tags

  • til sakri
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